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Turning Back the Pages

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30 years ago – February 15, 1985

Central City is being sued for $150,000 by James J. Peyrouse, a former employee of the city. At last year’s annual reorganization meeting, he was not reappointed to the position of city street and water commissioner. Peyrouse, who lives in the Lakeview Subdivision, has filed a $150,000 claim against the City of Central and Mayor William C. Russell Jr. and Rand Anderson, J.D. Carelli, Bruce Schmalz, and Florence Farringer as members of the City Council. According to the summons, filed in the United States District Court, council members have 20 days to answer the complaint. The first claim listed by Richard L. Miller, the attorney for Peyrouse, states that the action of the council “deprived plaintiff of rights… guaranteed him by the fifth and fourteenth amendments of the Constitution.” He states that Peyrouse was not granted “due process, procedural or substantive” before “denying and taking his property interest in his employment.” As a direct and proximate result of the wrongful acts, the amount of the first claim is $25,000. The second claim, entitled “outrageous conduct,” has resulted in the second claim being $25,000 by “reason of wrongful actions of the defendants.” The third claim, for $100,000, is for punitive damages. Miller alleges that the “firing was without formal notice, presentation of charges, opportunity for a hearing or any other requirements of due process.” He states that “there was, and is, no competent evidence to support the allegations of the defendants.”

The home of Bob and Wilma Nye caught on fire Monday evening. The house is located in Chase Gulch in Black Hawk. Black Hawk Fire Chief Mark Spellman said the department was notified about 6:30 p.m. It was spotted by someone on the Casey in Central City. That street overlooks Chase Gulch. Spellman said Bob Dornbrock, who lives down the road from the Nye’s and is the Gilpin County road supervisor, heard the call on his county radio. Before firemen could arrive, Dornbrock went to investigate and reported flames coming through the roof. Within minutes of the alarm, two Black Hawk fire trucks and 10 firefighters responded. Central City sent two trucks and about 10 people. High winds were prevalent when the firemen arrived, Spellman said. The nearest fire hydrant was about 1,200 feet away, but firefighters were able to get the lines connected and though not out, the fire was under control within about 30 minutes of the departments’ arrival. No one was home at the time of the blaze. It appears, Spellman said, that it was an electrical fire that had been smoldering. It started in the attic area of the home, then went to the roof and down into the walls. There is extensive heat and smoke damage to the interior of the home.

Charges filed against George Armbright of Black Hawk for allegedly driving on the wrong side of the road were dismissed in Gilpin County Court on Monday. Armbright was issued a summons by Technician Lyle Wohlers of the Colorado State Patrol in November 21, 1984, when the Gilpin County RE-1 school bus, driven by Armbright, collided with a pickup driven by Kimberlee Boudreau of Gilpin County. Armbright submitted his own motion before Judge Andrew J. Krodshen to reverse the charge and dismiss the original citation on the grounds that the citation was incorrect. Krodshen dropped the charge originally filed because Wohlers filed the wrong charge. The case and charge were dismissed. Boudreau was also charged with driving on the wrong side of the road as a result of the accident. The charge was dismissed against her last week when Wohlers failed to appear in court.

60 years ago – February 18, 1955

From the Editor: Was my face red last week? Was I embarrassed? Was I humiliated and humble? The answer to the three questions is YES. Last Thursday I left here to attend the Colorado Press Association meetings in Denver. I was garbed in my best bib and tucker, and with my tux wrapped in wrapping paper and carried under my arm, merrily wended my way to the Queen City to be present at the meetings. I arose bright and early Friday morning to attend the breakfast of the Past Presidents of the Association and spent at least half an hour in the lobby of the Cosmopolitan Hotel in trying to find what particular room meetings would be held. No soap! I then inquired, from the desk clerk, and he raised his eyebrows and looked upon me with a supercilious look, and informed me the meetings would be held this weekend. Well, a little mountain editor can make a mistake or two in his lifetime, so this week I will be in attendance at these meetings.

Mrs. Minnie McCoy and brother Jack Welsh were up from Denver last Saturday. They were accompanied by J.R. Welch and Karl and Kirt Isberg. They enjoyed a rather cold picnic on Clear Creek in the afternoon.

Ben Lindberg, of Denver, spent the weekend here at his home on Casey Avenue.

Mrs. George Eustice entertained the members of the Episcopal Guild of St. Paul’s Episcopal Church at her home last Thursday evening. Devotional meetings will be held every Thursday evening during Lent, the first meeting to be held being February 24th at the home of Mrs. R.L. Laird.

Mr. and Mrs. Jack Kruse, of Denver, visited with his aunt, Mrs. Helen Neno, last Sunday.

Mr. Arthur Gray entertained at two tales of bridge last Wednesday afternoon in which Mrs. Perl Neff was winner of first prize.

Miss Mary Lynch has gone to Denver to remain until the weather and water conditions are more favorable here.

Among those seen last Sunday were Mr. and Mrs. George Leyen of Rollinsville, Mr. and Mrs. Ben Moss of Golden, Mr. Don Rowe and Miss Marilyn Nelson of Denver.

Dr. J. D. Nassimbene and family have moved to their newly purchased house, the McNeill dwelling, in Chase Gulch. It is good to see lights in this large house, after being dark for so many years!

90 years ago – February 20, 1925

Sixteen hundred gallons of water a minute poured through the rock seams of the roof of the east portal of the Moffat Tunnel Sunday from what engineers believe to be an underground cavern filled with water. It was at first believed that the tunnel had tapped one of the many “bottomless lakes” on the east side of the Divide, but as workmen pushed ahead yesterday the water flow dropped from 1,600 to 1,400 gallons a minute and is expected to stop soon. The natural slope of the tunnel is carrying away the flow although the dripping water slackens the work considerably. Ideal rock conditions are being struck at east portal and the work of driving the main railroad tunnel is exceeding beyond all records it was said. V.A. Kaufman, resident engineer at west portal, said yesterday that he believed they were striking a solid rock at this time. During the whole length of the west portal the rock has been seamed and soft, necessitating extensive timbering and greatly added to the cost of boring the tunnel.

Mr. William H. Floyd St., left for his ranch Saturday to remain.

John Dunn left for Central on Monday to remain.

Mr. Charles Ferguson left Friday to spend the weekend with his daughters, returning Sunday.

Shad Reid left for Arvada on Wednesday.

Miss Elizabeth Tipton came up Friday to visit with her mother and sisters, returning on Saturday, accompanied by her sister, Miss Eva Haldi.

Messrs. Dave Nelson, John Dunn, J.A. Boveril and Hugo Nelson attended the dance in Central Saturday evening.

120 years ago – February 15, 1895

“Pauline Gavotte,” one of Leo A. Klein’s latest piano productions, should be in every home in Gilpin County where there is an instrument. Send for a copy. Prince 50 cents.

Last week’s Idaho Springs Gazette said that some of Gilpin County’s married men are very much agitated over the “age of consent” bill. A law to protect innocent Gilpin benedicts when they go to Denver is evidently sadly needed.

A new tunnel enterprise with heavy financial backing has been started for the rich gold deposits of Bellevue and Gilpin County. It will have about one mile less to run than some of the other propositions and will intersect great country.

Manager Newell informs us that the cold weather of the past two weeks has interfered to such an extent as to warrant him in closing down the Penn Mill at Black Hawk until such time as the weather moderates, which may not be longer than a couple of weeks. He will take advantage of the opportunity of make much needed repairs on the main shaft of the Concrete Mine, which when completed, will be sunk to a greater depth. Breaking ore in this mine will continue, which will be stored on the stulls until such as the mill is again ready to start up.

Last week the Sauer-McShane Mercantile Company, of this city, held their annual meeting, at which the following named stockholders were elected as directors and officers for the ensuing year: Directors: Otto Sauer, Wm. Scholl, Elisha Nicholls, Ben. P. Thomas, John C. McShane. Officers: Otto Sauer, president; Ben. P. Thomas, vice-president; secretary and treasurer, John C. McShane. The business of this company for the year 1894 shows an increase of $20,000 over the year 1893. They have increased their storage capacity for receiving goods in car-load lots, and the present year will be better enabled than ever before to please their customers.

Born: In Idaho Springs, February 14, to the wife of R. B. Wall, a daughter. Friend “Curly,” by which name he is well known in Gilpin County, is a proud father. His friends this side the North and South Clear Creek divides extend him congratulations. “Nothing like being papa to children,” as he was wont to say when handling the reigns between Central and Nevadaville in years gone by.

Married: In Central City, at the residence of Ed. W. Davis, February 14, Mr. George J. Grimsley to Miss Rosa F. Klein, both of Russell Gulch. The wedding was a very quiet affair, owing to the severe illness of Mrs. Davis, a sister of the bride.

Died: In Nevadaville, February 9, Celia, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George Weispeck, after a brief illness of membranous croup, aged 5 years. The funeral occurred last Tuesday, the 12th, from the Church of the Assumption, this city. Interment was made in the Catholic Cemetery. The parents of the deceased child have the condolence of a large circle of friends in their bereavement.

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