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Creepy Crawling through the night

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In Central City October 27th & 28th

By Jaclyn Schrock

You can play your own version of Clue and “who done it” if you dare to walk the sidewalks at night in Central City as part of the 9th Annual Central City Creepy Crawl. Starting at the Century Casino, by the Mid-town Grill, tickets are available online from Gilpin Historical Society for $15, from 7-9:40 pm each night. Walking tours began every twenty minutes last weekend, and will again this weekend on October 27th and 28th, with guides for a “spiritual” time.

Traditionally, crawlers like you and I are walking the same streets these historical folks did, complete with creaking floor boards in the dimly light rooms of the oldest historic buildings in Central City. Each year the Crawl has a different route and set of “spirits” and stories to be unraveled.

Their evidence revealed and spirit’s stories told have been assured of factual truths by David Forsyth with Gilpin Historical Society, with no guarantees the spirits themselves have not embellished them at all. The stories are told of Patrick Ryan, an old maid, Giuseppe “Joe” Roma, Pietro Dellochress, and George Harrison.

Creepy Crawlers gather in a room kindly made available by the Century Casino. Walking the creepy streets in the dark requires folks to stay close together. Safety is everyone’s major interests as we walked along uneven surfaces, stepping through doorways that may have settled in their 150 years of footsteps. Electronic sounds are startling to the spirits so we were told those may bring unwelcome responses. Pictures were permitted, but without flashes. However, you may be surprised by what appears in your photos. Spirits may request your assistance in some affairs, so beware of who you are dealing with. Tours of some of the buildings are available in the daytime, but during the Creepy Crawl you must stay in the areas provided by your guides, who are your safe keepers.

Walking out onto Spring Street you walk north to Lawrence Street and turning west eerily walking to the first doorway on the right, just before reaching the Visitor’s Center, room number 1.

Continuing uphill, going west, the street mysteriously is now Eureka Street as you pass Main Street, well-lit with strings of lights. One of the first doorways on the right after Main Street, room number 2, is the old
Williams Stables with blue arching double wooden doors. Replacing the horse walk way it is framed so you have to step over the wooden door frame back down on the floor, and other uneven surfaces to an open area with old theater seats, dark and suspiciously arranged.

Out from the old stables you go uphill to cross the street and your guide takes you into the famous and elegant  Opera House, to find seating in the back, room number 3.

Back down Eureka past the Face on the Barroom Floor, you enter a hall with round tables and chairs on the same side of the street as the Opera House, the window names it Little Kingdom Room, room 4.

Last, turn the corner onto Main Street, with the light strings on both sides of the street (a welcome from the dimmer areas of Eureka Street) to the first doorway on the right, room (saloon) number 5.

Perhaps you can sort out the recalled details from this year’s Creepy Crawl. Use the previously mentioned tour of buildings to name the rooms where stories are revealed. As in the game “Clue” devised  by Anthony E Pratt in 1949, you do have to be in each mysterious room to match the suspect, the method, and when the events occurred. You can only find the answers to these clues revealed by going on Central City’s Creepy Crawl.

The volunteer guides to each Spirit’s story have been called in by Deborah Wray. Gilpin Historical Society wishes to thank these bold guides for volunteering to withstand the chills and frights while supporting the often stunned guests on the tours. Thank you volunteers: Gary Huffman, Jan Doell, Carol Mirarck, Sue and Bryce Young, Janell and Roy Ince, Gail Keller, Suzanne Mathews, Milda and Chuck Pfleghardt, Nicki Fredrick, Ray Wilbur, and Cindy Kayl.

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